Thursday, February 14, 2013

2004 Aston Martin Vanquish Zagato - Approved

2004 Aston Martin Vanquish Zagato
2004 Aston Martin Vanquish Zagato
 This car looks like it was a one off concept car by Aston Martin. Unique, less than 500 made. Fits the Show or Display requirements and was approved for this exemption. Since it was based off the hardtop car, the engine should have been close to what was offered in the USA. 


The Vanquish was the basis of two concept cars, both shown at the International Geneva Motor Show in 2004, the Zagato Roadster (a 2-seat convertible) and the Bertone Jet 2 (a 2-door shooting brake).


Zagato and Aston Martin: a strong alliance that goes back to the 60s with the legendary DB4 GTZ, continued in the 80s with the Vantage and Volante, and is now firmer than ever in the new millennium with the DB7 Zagato and American Roadster 1.

These are the cult cars of collectors and enthusiasts, always prime examples of the “instant classic”.

At this year’s Geneva Motor Show, Zagato is presenting the Roadster version of the Aston Martin Vanquish, partly leaving unchanged the original project. For the first time, this Milan workshop is not giving an entirely new look to the production model, but is offering an interesting variation of the Vanquish, introducing innovative, futuristic touches of style.

While the Aston Martin DB7 Zagato and AR1 were initially presented to customers in the form of a limited edition, immediately sold out, the Vanquish Roadster is a “provocation” proposed by Zagato with the backing of Aston Martin itself.

Close cooperation between Nori Harada, Zagato’s Automotive Chief Designer, and Peter Hutchinson, Design Manager at Aston Martin, has resulted in this new car introducing elements that are a sharp break with the Roadster segment.

A decidedly original interpretation that combines the totally unique design of the rear with the introduction of a functional modular cover system.
A hard top for winter, developed to not appear as an add-on but as an integral part that also takes in the rear. On warmer days of the year, its place is taken by a transparent hardened glass and an easily used soft cover. 

Developed by Zagato’s engineers, this soft top is easily and simply mounted and, when not in use, is held in the luggage compartment without taking up much space.

The car has a round rear light cluster, a tapered tail to best feature the wheelbox and a completely new rear bumper. The hardened glass, with its curvy ‘double bubble’ form, emphasises how unique and valued is this proposal, balancing in a different, almost extravagant way, the relationship between the solid and void. 

Special care has been applied to the interior trim, made exclusive by the design and type of seaming introduced.
A luggage compartment immediately behind the seats can also be seen through the glass cover.

At the front, the Vanquish Roadster proposal retains the design of the coupe version famous for being James Bond’s most recent car.

Vanquish Roadster 

Height: 1265 mm
Width: 1923 mm
Length: 4685 mm
Wheelbase: 2690 mm
Front track: 1572 mm
Rear track: 1584 mm

Engine: V-12 
Capacity: 5935 cc
Torque Nm/rpm: 555/5000
Weight/power ratio: 541
Max speed: n.a.






HELP

HOW YOU MAY APPLY FOR PERMISSION TO IMPORT

Your signed application must include, at a minimum:
1. Your name, address, phone number, and FAX number.
2. Vehicle identification – make, model, model year, VIN or chassis number,
engine number, date of manufacture and mileage.
3. Location where you will store the vehicle in the United States.
4. Statement describing use on the public roads, if intended. If on-road use is requested, identify the Independent Commercial Importer (ICI) that will modify the vehicle to bring it into conformity with the requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency.
5. Basis for the application.
6. Attachments:
1. Photographs – ¾ frontal, ¾ rear, interior, odometer reading and special features (if appropriate).
2. Document from manufacturer or recognized historical source, identifying total production (production verification).
3. Proof of insurance conditioned on limited on-road use (not more than 2,500 miles accumulated in any 12-month period).
4. Identification of vehicle’s:
1. Technological significance – You must identify (be specific) the technology, engineering, and construction features of the vehicle that are advanced and of an unusual nature not commonly found in motor vehicles manufactured in the same time period; or
2. Historical significance – You must identify the historical significance of the vehicle. If a person of historical significance owned the vehicle, you must submit proof that this person owned the vehicle. If the vehicle was the first or last vehicle of a particular model, you must establish this through the manufacturer’s documentation or, if this is not available, through a recognized historical source. If the vehicle was "one of a kind," you must establish this also.
Items of significance must be numerically listed followed by the reason why the item is of significance.
You may then mail the application to:

Import and Certification Division
Office of Vehicle Safety Compliance (NVS-223)
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
Room W45-205
Washington, DC 20590

ON-ROAD USE

A vehicle eligible for Show or Display may receive NHTSA approval to be driven on the highway. The odometer must not register more than 2,500 miles in a 12-month period. NHTSA approval of limited on-road use is to allow the vehicle to be driven to and from nearby displays of similar automobiles. Another reason permission is granted is to maintain the vehicle’s engine, braking, lighting, and other dynamic systems in good working order. The vehicle is still required to meet EPA requirements. If the original engine in the vehicle will be replaced with a non-original engine to meet EPA requirements, it must be identified in your application since it may impact on the technological or historical significance of the vehicle. Email me if you need help importing vehicles.

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